Why You and I on the G-String Fell Flat

Excited to see Haru in a new Japanese drama, I instantly picked this up. While the concept had potential, the characterization of our protagonists was incredibly flat.

If this show had a theme, it would be escaping realities, something that didn’t click well with me.

Synopsis

Kogure Yaeko, Kitagawa Yukie, and Kase Rihito sign up for violin classes when they hear a woman play “Air on the G String” in a shopping mall. They form an unexpected friendship, confiding in each other about their personal problems after classes. However, Yaeko starts developing feelings for Rihito.

I stopped watching halfway through. So, the opinions and evidence expressed below are only up to what I watched (ep. 6 or 7, I believe).

Minor spoilers ahead.

Kogure Yaeko

Yaeko was devastated when her fiancé broke off their engagement due to his infidelity. Jobless and heartbroken, she’s entranced by the woman playing “Air on the G String” in a shopping mall. Having nothing to lose, she signs up for violin classes and meets Kitagawa Yukie and Kase Rihito.

While Yaeko becomes more passionate about playing the violin, it’s clear that she got into it just to get away from her problems.

At first, I found Yaeko’s character endearing. She’s going through a heartbreak and finds solace in music. But as the three characters bond, she becomes more engrossed in other people’s problems than her own, especially Rihito, which hinders her personal growth.

She lacks the self-confidence to find a new job. Though, she tries, she fails in getting any new leads. Though she could’ve gone back to her old company, she couldn’t bear to face the backlash of her failed engagement. She continues her music lessons, even without making an income.

Instead, she starts helping Rihito, a university student unable to get over his first love. Yaeko gives him advice and goes out to eat with him for company. And she starts overthinking when a drunk Rihito suddenly says she looks cute.

Kitagawa Yukie

I have a love-hate relationship with her character. She endures her cheating husband and frustrating mother for the sake of her child. At home, she plays the diligent wife well. However, when she’s with Yaeko and Rihito, she also becomes too engrossed in other people’s problems.

While her gossiping tendencies were entertaining at first, it quickly got frustrating. However, she genuinely cares for Rihito and Yaeko. While iffy about playing at a concert (proposed by Yaeko) at first, she still helps convince a reluctant Rihito to go through with it.

Even when Yukie couldn’t make it due to her mother falling ill, she’s still there with them in spirit. As cliche as that sounds, it was pretty touching after seeing how hard they worked for this concert.

It was even more touching when her teenage daughter supported her mother’s new hobby. The amount of BS Yukie had to deal with at home made her character more acceptable.

Kase Rihito

In contrast to his friends, Rihito is unable to face his own problems. The trio’s violin teacher, Kuzumi Mao, was Rihito’s brother’s fiancé and Rihito’s first love.

Rihito’s brother broke it off with Mao when he had an affair and married the other woman. While Rihito was furious, he couldn’t reprimand his brother. He also didn’t know what to do or say to Mao who was clearly heartbroken.

Through the violin lessons, he slowly rekindles the old friendship he and Mao had when he was younger. It’s evident that he’s still in love with her. However, he can’t bring himself to say anything.

Eventually, his older brother finds out that Rihito is taking lessons with Mao and gets involved.

Yaeko reprimands Rihito and convinces him to confess, which he does at the most awkward time. Rihito gets rejected, and Yaeko is there to pick up the pieces.

What didn’t click well with me was Rihito’s reluctance to do anything. While Yukie and Yaeko had some initiative, Rihito always needed someone to give him a hard push.

However, he’s the only one to take violin seriously. He practices hard and is diligent in his lessons when his personal feelings aren’t involved. Rihito also just wants the best for Mao.

Final Thoughts

There isn’t a single character I like in this show. If anything, Yukie’s daughter may be my favourite, and Mao is the most interesting character.

I might skip to the last episode just to see the ending.

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